Haiti

Haiti Signs $41.5 Million Contract to Reconstruct University Hospital 0

thumbReposted from Caribbean Journal

Haiti’s government and the International Health Group have signed a $41.48 million contract to rebuild the Hospital of the State University of Haiti. More…

NGO warns upcoming mining law in Haiti will leave $20bn of mineral wealth in foreign hands 0

ngo-warns-upcoming-mining-law-in-haiti-will-leave-20bn-of-mineral-wealth-in-foreign-hands-300x250Reposted from Mining.com
By Cecilia Jamasmie

Over three years after an earthquake devastated Haiti, killing more than 300,000, the country is banking on its mineral wealth to help take it off the poorest countries in the world list.

Since earlier this year, the country has been working on updating its old mining legislation with the assistance of The World Bank. More…

Tourism can help Haiti return to its halcyon days 0

Haiti's carnival of flowers in Port-au-Prince last year. The three-day festival celebrates new beginnings and the revitalisation of the island.

Haiti’s carnival of flowers in Port-au-Prince last year. The three-day festival celebrates new beginnings and the revitalisation of the island.

Reposted from The Guardian
Haiti proclaimed its independence in 1804, the first country in Latin America and the Caribbean to do so. Despite having to pay an extortionate independence fee, equivalent to $21bn (£14bn) in today’s money, it was a relatively prosperous and peaceful place to live.

Indeed, most Haitians had a decent life before the 1960s, when the country could have been likened to Canada and Australia in terms of human development indices. More…

Haiti – Economy : Towards the establishment of a PetroCaribe Economic Zone (PEZ) 0

g-8908Reposted from Haiti Libre

Saturday, at the end of VIII Petrocaribe Summit, held in Managua (Nicaragua), 28 and 29 June, the Heads of State and Government of more than a dozen countries, members of the Venezuela’s Petrocaribe oil alliance, agreed to focus their efforts on strengthening exchanges in regional transportation, communication, agriculture, tourism and social service projects. The trade agreement is not entered in the details and no change in the existing oil agreements Petrocaribe was formally discussed. More…

Haiti sees big drop in quake homeless 0

haiti-earthquake-homelessReposted from The Miami Herald
By Jacqueline Charles

More than three years after Haiti’s devastating earthquake, there are 279,000 people still living in squalid encampments, an 82 percent drop, the International Organization for Migration said Friday.

Also, the number of tent cities have dropped by 77 percent since the country was struck by a 7.0 massive quake on Jan. 12, 2010. The disaster left more than 300,000 dead and 1. 5 million homeless. The latest quake-homeless census was recorded between April and June, IOM said. More…

Haiti sees big money reviving flagging tourism 0

tr03_big

A water taxi waits for customers at the Wahoo Bay Beach hotel in Montrouis, Haiti

Reposted from Saudi Gazzette

by AP

MONTROUIS — The Club Indigo beach resort north of the Haiti capital was crowded with UN peacekeepers, aid workers, diplomats and missionaries on a recent Sunday. But the only real, live tourists seemed to be Anne Fournier and her husband.

The young couple from Montreal is a rarity in this afflicted country. Crime, health scares, hurricanes and the monster earthquake of January 2010 have badly damaged the tourism that was once a mainstay of the Haitian economy, attracting the likes of Mick Jagger and Jackie Onassis.
More…

Heavy investments for a Marriott Hotel in Port-au-Prince 0

port-au-prince.view1Reposted from: Haiti Business Week

By: Marina Vatav

IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, announced that it will provide $26.5 million in financing to Turgeau Developments S.A. to build a Marriott hotel in Port-au-Prince. The 175-room Marriott hotel is expected to open in 2015 and will offer a complete package of services and amenities. It will create an estimated 300 jobs during construction and more than 200 permanent jobs during operations.
More…

Haiti – Economy : Towards the establishment of a PetroCaribe Economic Zone (PEZ) 0

Reposted from Haiti Libre

Saturday, at the end of VIII Petrocaribe Summit, held in Managua (Nicaragua), 28 and 29 June, the Heads of State and Government of more than a dozen countries, members of the Venezuela’s Petrocaribe oil alliance, agreed to focus their efforts on strengthening exchanges in regional transportation, communication, agriculture, tourism and social service projects. The trade agreement is not entered in the details and no change in the existing oil agreements Petrocaribe was formally discussed.

More…

A new menu: The government tries to load up the plates of the poorest people in the Americas 0

HaitiReposted from The Economist

AID workers sometimes blame Haiti’s seemingly limitless supply of cheap imported rice for the country’s struggle to feed itself. More than half the population lives on the land, but still the country ships in half its food and 80% of its rice. Diri Miami, as imported rice from the United States is locally known, has become a staple over the past 30 years. The imports are prevalent partly because, at 3%, Haiti’s import tariffs on food are among the lowest in the Caribbean. This, combined with generous subsidies to farmers in the United States, means that the rice is cheaper than locally produced food. Many have argued for higher tariffs to protect local farmers. But a new drive to improve self-sufficiency aims not to raise tariffs but to make Haitian agriculture more efficient—and to change Haitian diets, too. More…

Haiti’s Mineral Fortune: Deliverance from Destitution? 0

HaitiReposted from National Geographic
By Saleem Ali

Haiti — the poorest country in the Western hemisphere has been struck by natural misfortunes and malevolent foreign intervention for decades. As the first independent nation to emerge from resettled African slaves in 1804, Haiti held much promise at its inception. Yet the nascent Haitian state was beset by marginalization from its neighbors, particularly the United States. The American government did not even recognize Haiti until 1861 for fear that the slave rebellion against the French colonial masters that created the country might inspire similar upheaval in the Southern plantations. However, as America and the rest of the Hemisphere finally embraced civil rights in the twentieth century, Haiti became a major locus of interest for investment and development. During the Cold War, Western nations supported despotic elites to serve their own interests in the region but in recent years, there has been a more genuine commitment to helping Haiti climb its way out of poverty. More…

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